A Guide to Cannabis Wellness

What’s New in Care By Design Ratios?

Care By Design pioneered CBD to THC ratios that deliver powerful relief. Since then, we’ve continued to research and innovate to offer cannabis wellness with unparalleled efficacy.  Our newly formulated ratio line goes beyond CBD and THC, harnessing the full therapeutic potential of the cannabis plant. We have reformulated our tinctures and soft gels to be more potent and effective than ever before. We’ve increased our cannabinoid count by at least 25% per ratio and added the minor but mighty cannabinoids, CBDa and THCa. Finally, we’re excited to announce our newest ratio, 40:1, with the highest amount of CBD on the California market. 

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A Beginner's Guide to CBD

CBD is one of more than a hundred “phytocannabinoids,” which are unique to cannabis sativa and endow the plant with its robust wellness properties. Like its close relative THC, CBD has many potential therapeutic properties that are being researched by scientists and doctors around the world. We believe that Cannabis sativa can naturally enhance overall wellness, and we’re only just beginning to tap into its potential. As a result, it can be challenging to figure out how and why to best use CBD. To help, here are some of the first steps to take when choosing a CBD product.

CBD ands THC molecules
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What Are CBD & THC?

CBD and THC are among the 100+ cannabinoids that are naturally produced by the flowers and leaves of the Cannabis sativa plant. Mounting research suggests that CBD and THC may be helpful for a wide range of maladies. Unlike THC, CBD does not make a person feel high. That’s because CBD and THC act in different ways on different receptors in the brain and body. Scientists have discovered that CBD, THC, other minor cannabinoids, and terpenes can amplify one another’s effects. This is widely known as the “entourage effect.”

CBDa and THCa molecules
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Meet the Minors! Beyond CBD & THC

THC and CBD aren’t the only cannabinoids produced by the cannabis plant. . . far from it! There’s also CBN, CBG, THCV, THCA, CBDA and others. Over 100 unique cannabinoids have been identified – many with unique therapeutic benefits of their own — and new ones being discovered all the time. THCP and CBDP, for example, were only discovered in 2019! Minor cannabinoids are generally non-psychoactive and are believed to play an integral role in creating the “entourage effect.” At Care By Design, we only use “full-spectrum” extracts, so you get the full benefits of the plant. Mother Nature knows best. Our job is simply to make fresh, clean product that is easy to integrate into your wellness regime.

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What Are Terpenes?

Terpenes are organic compounds that are common in many plants and responsible for distinctive aromas and flavors. They are the primary constituents of most essential oils. Ever smell lavender and feel a sense of peace? It’s the terpene called linalool that your nose is detecting. How about the extra energy you may feel when walking through a forest of pine trees? That aroma is largely alpha-pinene and beta-pinene. The cannabis plant produces many terpenes, accounting for its distinctive smell. While scientists are only beginning to study the benefits of terpenes, they have been widely used in folk medicine for centuries. 

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What does full-spectrum mean?

A full-spectrum extract pulls much more than just CBD or THC from the cannabis plant. Quite literally, the extract contains the full spectrum of active compounds that can be beneficial for wellness. Many argue that full-spectrum oil is the most potent form of cannabis. As explained in the definition of Entourage Effect, the inclusion of multiple cannabinoids as well as terpenes increases the extract’s ability to have a desired reaction within the body.

Graphic showing how the endocannabinoid system works
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Cannabinoid Science

You – and nearly every other animal on the planet – have evolved an intricate physical network known as the Endocannabinoid System (ECS). The ECS regulates a wide variety of physiological processes like pain-perception, mood, memory, appetite, stress, immune function, and homeostasis. Homeostasis means keeping the bodily systems in balance. You can think of the ECS as the body’s universal regulator. If some of our internal systems are dialed-up too high or turned-down too low, it is the job of the ECS to bring everything back into equilibrium. 

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Cannabis & Hemp: What’s the Difference?

Hemp and cannabis both share the taxonomic classification of Cannabis sativa. Within the United States, plants with less than 0.3% THC by dry weight are labeled hemp; plants with more than 0.3% THC are labeled cannabis. But while they are technically the same plant, there are meaningful differences. Hemp has typically been bred for industrial uses like rope and clothing. It tends to have more fibrous stalks and less of the sticky resin. Cannabis has been bred for use as a consumable, resulting in plants that contain more resin, which is rich in cannabinoids, terpenes, and other fascinating compounds. CBD can be extracted from both hemp and cannabis.

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How to Choose the Right Product

With so many options, it can be challenging to figure out how to best use cannabis to support your wellness. The Society of Cannabis Clinicians and Leaf411 are great resources for the latest cannabis research. Decide what type and duration of effects you seek for your particular condition. For fast-acting effects, use a tincture or inhale a vape as the benefits can be felt within minutes. Alternatively, digesting soft gels or gummies takes longer for the body to absorb and stay in your system longer. Most importantly, find a ratio of CBD to THC that best meets your needs and tolerance for psychoactivity.